APA Writing Format - AhlynewsInfo

APA Writing Format

Home
Services
About us
Prices
Anti-Fraud Policy
Order Now

Fantastic
15% discount will make you happy!
Save this discount code:
15OFFJUST4U
Get The Discount

Practical Abstract Examples

Getting into college is a huge achievement; still, it comes with some strings attached. In particular, students will have to write all sorts of new academic assignments, and follow some totally new formatting requirements. Abstract for a paper in APA style is just one of the new sections students will have to master sooner or later. Still, before you start googling for examples of abstract online, you might want to consider whether you need one and what features account for a good example abstract. Let’s find out together.

Do you need abstract examples at all?

Whether you need an abstract example at all will mostly depend on the type of paper you are working on. In a simple essay, for example, and abstract is definitely not a necessary section. In a thesis or a dissertation, however, it is. When it comes to research abstract examples, the issue can be a little tricky. On the whole, any kind of research paper presupposes an abstract. However, in their first years of college, students often work on relatively short research papers, which can come without any abstract at all. If you really want to be on the safe side here, consulting your professor is the wisest idea.

A good example of an abstract: things to remember

If you really want to understand what makes for a great example of abstract, always start with the purpose of this section. Most students believe abstracts to be some sort of pre-introduction to their paper. This, however, could not be farther from the truth. Differently from an intro that states the problem, a sample abstract gives the gist of the entire paper — the intro, the main body, and the results.

So, if you are writing an abstract for a thesis, this quick synopsis should include all the relevant information you discovered in a few sentences. Remember that an abstract is going to be the only part of your paper that will be listed in the bibliographical references. So, when you write it, make sure this small section fully conveys the meaning and the importance of your work.

Now, let’s try and see how you can actually achieve all of those in your very own abstract example.

How to start writing your abstract

We cannot stress this enough — examples of abstracts that look like an intro are not good abstract examples. This part of your paper should be viewed as a stand-alone text or a short synopsis of your entire paper. So, it would not be wise to start working on an abstract before finishing the paper. When it comes to the actual formatting requirements, they usually go as follows:

  • 12-point Times New Roman font
  • Double spacing
  • Name of the section centered
  • No ident at the start of the paragraph
  • Indented list of keywords
  • No longer than a page

If you have already looked up APA formatting guidelines, you probably notice that the formatting of research abstract examples is not that different from the rest of your paper. Another piece of advice before we move to some real-life example of an abstract would be to consult your school requirements about the length of an abstract. Even though the general APA requirements remain the same for all educational levels and academic majors, the acceptable length of an abstract often depends on a particular establishment. Now, let’s analyze one of the actual examples of abstract.

Example of abstract in linguistics

This paper describes and analyzes the Naxi language, which belongs to the Sino-Tibetan family and is now on the brink of extinction. Some peculiarities of the language in question made it interesting for the research, as Naxi bears a certain resemblance to Chinese and Japanese languages, though at the same time differs from them. A closer research, however, shows that Naxi grammar, morphology and especially intonation has some features not characteristic of the other world languages, which makes its preservation a top priority for linguists.

The example comes from a 6-page research paper in linguistics, which is why less than a hundred word abstract is a perfect fit. However, there are other examples of abstracts that presuppose a longer text. A Master’s thesis is definitely one of them — here, the abstract might have taken almost an entire page, because the author would have to summarize every chapter of the paper, paying a special attention to the results section.

In this particular example abstract, however, the paper is relatively short and is not subdivided into any chapters or sections. So, a short abstract that quickly states the problem and highlights the results of the research is enough.

Order a sample abstract from us

If you are still having trouble figuring out what your abstract should look like, or have any trouble completing the whole paper, you can always get in touch with our team for help. While this is technically against the academe rules, there is no shame in asking for help when you are stuck or are simply looking for some professional, quality examples of an abstract. However, there are more reasons to choose a custom writing service, for instance:

  • Saving time for major subjects: when you pay for abstract examples and other academic assignments in one of your minor subjects, you are, in fact, investing more time in your major — which is exactly why you came to college in the first place.
  • Improving academic grade: even one or two professionally written abstract examples can seriously improve your academic grade so it might be worth a shot if you are already falling behind.
  • Investing into activities that truly matter: it is quite common to have a part-time job in the final years of college, so once again delegating some of your paperwork might be a wise idea.

Here are some benefits of ordering examples of an abstract or any other academic assignments from our qualified team:

  • Reasonable cost
  • Quick turnaround time
  • Full accord with your academic requirements
  • 100% originality
  • Payment protection
  • Multiple rounds of revisions
  • Written by subject matter experts
  • Confidentiality guaranteed
Get a 15% Discount on your first order
We always provide hot offers
Save this discount code:
15OFFJUST4U
Get The Discount

  • Thesis Proposal
  • Personal Statement
  • Lab Report
  • Homework
  • Editing Service
  • Dissertation
  • Custom Writing Service
  • Coursework
  • Case Study Writing
  • Buy Essays
  • Book Report
  • Assignment
  • Order Your Excellent Paper
  • Prices
  • Services
  • 100 Best Cause and Effect Essay Topics
  • How to Make an Essay Longer
  • Tragic Hero Examples
  • How To Write Dialogue In An Essay
  • Gun Control Essay
  • Essay Conclusion Examples
  • Practical Abstract Examples
  • Research Paper Outline
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Types of Essays: Informational Guide
  • Demonstration Speech Topics
  • Impromptu Speech Topics
  • Synthesis Essay Outline
  • Narrative Essay Outline
  • Literary Analysis Outline
  • Responsibility Essay Sample
  • How to Write a Globalization Essay
  • Narrative Essay Examples
  • Compare And Contrast Essay Examples
  • Informative Speech Examples
  • Persuasive Essay Examples
  • Rhetorical Analysis Essay Examples
  • Thesis Statement Examples
  • 110+ Expository Essay Topics
  • Essay Outline Templates

Contact Information

Copyright©2018 TheEssayClub. All rights reserved

15%OFF
Discount!
15OFFJUST4U

Discount code

Use now

Awesome
15% OFF
discount here
Save this discount code:
15OFFJUST4U

Get The Discount

JEPS Bulletin

The Official Blog of the Journal of European Psychology Students

The structure of an APA research paper


Throughout the course of our studies, we have all read a lot of literature reviews or scientific papers, those whose methodological standard we could have learned from and improved and others that make us wonder how they ever made it through the peer- review process of the journal. Nevertheless, we have to admit that we all still make mistakes and sometimes submit manuscripts that do not match APA guidelines. In order to improve our general knowledge about how to format papers in our beloved APA style or to refresh our previous knowledge related to it, this post intends to give a brief overview over the structure of a scientific paper and some other crucial APA features your paper should contain.
Main sections of your research paper
Whereas a literature review summarizes the most important experimental and qualitative studies that have been conducted in a specific are of interest, the experimental report is the most common form, one that you will employ when reporting the results of your own thesis or study. Its structure reflects the scientific method and the steps relate to the course your research project follows. It helps interested readers to quickly find the section they are looking for and as it is universally determined by the APA guidelines, it is easy to memorize since you will always have to follow the same structure. Thus, your paper should cover the following areas of interest:

  • why is the topic so important and what the research question and problem is (covered in your introduction)
  • what you did in order to approach and solve the problem/research question (covered in your method section
  • your findings that will help make the academic world a little bit brighter (result section)
  • such as the interpretation of your findings and posterior work should investigate in the future (covered in your discussion section)

Your paper
Your paper should be typed, double-spaced on standard-sized paper (8.5″ x 11″) with 1″ margins on all sides. APA recommends you to use  12 pt Times New Roman as your font, since it is well readable. Nevertheless, make sure to check the guidelines for paper submission every journal has in order to prepare and structure your research work according to their wishes. If you refer to them, it might help you speeding up the reviewing process a little bit, since they will not have to make a large amount of technical corrections. In the following paragraph, the sections of a scientific paper are listed chronologically from the beginning of the paper to its end providing some short ideas on the core features that those sections should contain. Normally an experimental report consists of the following sections:

  1. The title page

The title page should contain the following important parameter:  title of the paper, the author’s name, and the institutional affiliation. Type your title in upper and lowercase letters centered in the upper half of the page. APA recommends that your title be no more than 12 words in length and that it should not contain abbreviations or words that serve no purpose. Your title may take up one or two lines. All text on the title page, and throughout your paper, should be double-spaced.
All subsequent pages of your article should contain a running head that indicates the title of your paper in the left column of the page, like this:
TITLE OF YOUR PAPER

[Text you want to write on this page]

2.The abstract

Beginning a new page after the first one introducing your research, your abstract page should already contain the above mentioned running head.  On the first line of the abstract page, center the word “Abstract” (no bold, no formatting, italics, underlining, or quotation marks).
Beginning with the next line, write a concise summary of the key points of your research. (Do not indent.) Your abstract should contain at least your research topic, research questions, participants, methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions. Moreover, it should be a single paragraph double-spaced with a normal lenght of somewhat between 150 and 250 words.

You may also want to list keywords from your paper in your abstract. To do this, indent as you would if you were starting a new paragraph, type Keywords: (italicized), and then list your keywords. Listing your keywords will help researchers find your work in databases.

3.The introduction

After having briefly described your entire research conducted in your paper, you can now focus on a more detailed presentation of the theoretical background of your research topic. Never forget to refer to the authors you received the theoretical information from and to enlist them later on in the reference list.

4. The method

This section will contain information about the participants of your experimental study, the research design you have employed, the procedure underlying your experiment (or whatever it is you did to collect some qualitative or quantitative data) such as a brief information about the analysis method (for instance: a two- factor ANOVA) you have used to analyze the data collected. Materials or questionnaires that you have presented the participants should be referred to briefly and added to the Appendix section at the end of your paper, because it would interrupt the flow of reading if you inserted it here.

5. The results

A description of the results you have obtained from your research is destined to be presented here. Sometimes, it is useful to present your results in a table or a figure, but they should simply be additional to the results you have mentioned in the text, not replacing it. Focus on a rather descriptive information about your results, since its discussion will follow in the next part.

6. The discussion

Since the result section is rather descriptive and you have suffered from not being able to reveal the brilliant interpretations, this is where you can impress the world out there or your supervisor with the conclusions you have drawn from your data analysis. Nevertheless, do not forget to include limitations and future research ideas in this section.

7. The reference list

Sometimes, you feel like the reference list and those thousands of different citation rules you have to stick to need an entire study programme on its own. It really is crazy, but those previous posts about referencing software and ideas could help you manage it.

8. Appendices (if you have any)

9.Tables and/or  figures (if you have any that have been too large to insert already in the     result section)

If all of those guidelines seem familiar to you, you have known already and frequently design the papers you write according to it, then you seem to be an APA genius. If this post helped you sort the diffuse ideas you had in your mind, you are more than welcome. But if there are some questions that remain unanswered, discuss them with us here or in our APA Questions and Answers tool here.

References

American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington DC: Author.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________

As being part of EFPSA’s JEPS team, Sina Scherer works as JEPS Bulletin’s editor and is currently enrolled in the last year of her Master programme in Work and Organizational Psychology at the Westfälische Wilhelmsuniversität Münster. Her fields of interest cover the areas of Intercultural Psychology, Personality and Organizational Psychology such as Health Psychology.

Tweet
Sina Scherer

Sina Scherer

Sina Scherer, studying at University of Münster, Germany, and University of Padova, Italy. I have previously worked as JEPS Bulletin Editor and am active in a NMUN project simulating the political work of the United Nations as voluntary work. I am interested in cognitive neuroscience and intercultural psychology, anthropology and organizational psychology (aspects of work-life balance, expatriation).

More Posts

Facebook twitter rss

Share this:

  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Categories

  • APA Guidelines
  • Authors experience
  • Discussion
  • How-to
  • Interviews
  • JEPS
  • Literature research
  • Manuscript analysis
  • Open Access
  • Presenting results
  • Publishing in scientific journals
  • Research Methodology
  • Scientific writing
  • Uncategorized

Tags

abbreviations
Abstract
Access to databases
acta
advice on scientific writing
APA
APA style
choosing research topic
common mistakes
Daryl J. Bem
DOI
Elsevier
evaluative criteria
file-drawer problem
Formatting tables
funding
funny
general practitioner
grammar
how to in APA
impact factor
interview
introduction
journal publishers in psychology
literature review
literature search
making presentations
open access
publication bias
publishing
publishing in JEPS
qualitative
qualitative research
quantitative
references
research
research methods
review process
Right to Research Coalition
scientific publishing
scientific writing style
sopa
statistics
tips
web resources

Follow Us

Facebook twitter rss