Essay: The Art of Photography

Essay: The Art of Photography

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War photographer poem essay

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war photographer poem essay

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The Daily Vox

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The Daily Vox

Photo Essays

Photo essay: The essence of Joburg through a photographer’s lens

Mbali PhalaBy Mbali Phala


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MADODA MKHOBENI spoke to MBALI ZWANE about documenting the everyday struggle of people who are trying to make a living in the city.

madoda 9

Photography allows me to venture into various places and spaces in the city. Being able to document everyday life enables me to meet people and understand their stories and some of the obstacles that they’re faced with on a daily basis.

Madoda 1

When I was studying journalism at a college in Braamfontein, I met a vendor selling the Kitso newspaper, a youth publication that gave youngsters a platform to hone their media skills. I went to their offices while I was in the second year of my course and they offered me an opportunity to write stories for them, with a particular focus on Johannesburg CBD and townships.

Madoda 6

My major challenge was getting photographs for my stories. Sometimes the photographers in the office wouldn’t deliver photos so my stories were published without pictures. That’s when I decided to buy myself an analogue camera and started capturing photographs of wherever I was. Whether it was downtown Joburg, an event, or the township I live in. As a self-taught photographer, I began to realise technical things about my photographs that I didn’t like – for example, the exposure was awful. So I decided to enrol myself in a beginner’s course at the Market Photo Workshop in Newtown, concentrating on film and the technicalities of capturing photographs. In 2009, I completed the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography Programme, which really helped my career. Soon after that, I helped to established the Soweto Photo Album Collective and participated in numerous local and international group exhibitions and projects.

Madoda 2

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Johannesburg is an elusive and complex place, where many things are happening. Through the years, things have shifted while other things, like poverty, remain constant. Vendors are still operating from dawn to sunset, the city outskirts are occupied by informal recyclers with their trolleys, and women still holding on tight to their bags when they walk the streets of the CBD. There’s different people here with different circumstances but they’re all battling for one thing, which is making a living.

Madoda 4
madoda 8

Spaces are the most important thing to me when I am taking photos, and on most days, these spaces aren’t comfortable. There’s a ton of stories to tell, especially the dark stories about the people living in the city. But it’s a bit difficult to get to the core of these stories because people question everything. They’ll ask me why I’m standing next to them, why I’m taking a photograph of this and why do I want to photograph them when there’s other people in the city. These actions make it difficult to tell their stories, the way they would like their stories to be told,  or share insight into living conditions in the city and everyday challenges.  

Madoda 5

madoda 7

I sometimes wish I could be invisible, because that way, I’d be able to capture things in the CBD without any interference.

Madoda 3

All photos by Madoda Mkhobeni.

Mkhobeni is currently a freelance photographer and has published photographs in various news and photography media including Camera Austria, Le Monde and South African newspapers and magazines. 


Braamfontein Johannesburg kitso newspaper

Mbali Phala

Mbali Phala

    Mbali Phala is a journalist for The Daily Vox. She dabbles in writing about socioeconomic issues and the arts.

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    1 Comment
    1. Themba Mazibuko says

      Well done, Madoda Mkhobeni

      Reply

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    The New York Times

    Lens

    |
    Essay: Slow Photography in an Instantaneous Age




    Lens: Photography, Video and Visual Journalism

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    Slide Show

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    10 Photographs

    Credit Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times




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    Essay: Slow Photography in an Instantaneous Age


    By Fred R. Conrad

    May. 17, 2009

    Fast is fine, but slow can be much better.

    Digital photography and the ascent of the Web have quickened our jobs. Instead of one deadline a day, we now have continual deadlines, bringing exponentially increasing speed to what we do at The Times.

    One advantage of using larger formats is that the process is slower. It takes time to set up the camera. It takes time to visualize what you want.

    When doing portraits, it enables the photographer to talk and listen to subjects, to observe their behavior. A camera can trap a photographer sometimes. You can look so intently through a viewfinder that you are unaware of the picture in front of you. When I use an 8-by-10 camera for portraits, I will compose the picture and step back. Using a long cable release, I will look at the subject and wait for the moment. It’s very liberating.

    Some of my portraiture work for a Metro section series “Tribes of New York” included “ The Ushers ,” “ The Messengers ,” “ The Goth Girls ,” and “ Ladies of the Red Hat Society .”

    The same technique worked for me when I photographed architecture for the “ Geometries ” series. But there was another liberating aspect, too. With exposures that may take as long as an hour, you really don’t know what the end result will be. There is a little bit of faith involved, and a lot of imagination. That, and the fact that you have to wait to develop the film, just adds to the excitement.

    When the Lens project started, I hadn’t shot large format black-and-white film for quite a while. In fact, there is no dark room in the new Times headquarters. Lucky for me, Chuck Kelton and his Kelton Labs are still around. Then I needed to settle on a film and developer. I ended up with Fuji Neopan and Efke 25, made in Croatia. For a developer, I chose Rodinal. It’s been around since the 1890s. It was made by Agfa, which no longer exists, but I found a store in Hollywood, Freestyle Photographic Supplies , that carried both the film and developer.

    One memorable experience during this project was photographing the one remaining Loew’s Wonder Theater that still shows movies. Loew’s built five Wonder Theaters in the New York metropolitan area in the late 1920s. Two of these movie palaces are now churches. One no longer has its Wonder organ or a movie screen; instead, it hosts music events and boxing matches. One has remained vacant and decaying since 1984. And then there is the Jersey Loew’s in Journal Square. The theater is being restored. It has an original Wonder organ that plays. They even show movies.

    I shot the theater from the balcony, while the movie “Blade Runner” was playing. I had no idea how long to leave the shutter open. Since the movie was two hours long, I decided to make two exposures — an hour each. It was during those two exposures that I realized how different and special it was to be shooting on film. When you shoot digital, the images are quick and you spend more time looking at the back of your camera than you do seeing.

    I hope that film and large-format cameras stick around for a while. I love the results and I cherish the process. More importantly, when I have the time and opportunity to shoot big film, I feel a connection with photographers who came before me. That may be the most important reason.

    Comments are no longer being accepted.

    Nicholas Dynan

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    12:56 am

    Nice essay, I have a distinct love for large format even though I shoot mostly digital. I just wanted to comment that your first image of the Loew’s Jersey Theater in Jersey City shows striking similarity to if not a copy of Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Theater” series from 1978 in which he photographed one image during the entire duration of the film.

    Dimitri Malaspinas

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    1:29 am

    Superb as usual. Thank you N.Y Times

    Jarda Ruzicka

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    2:27 am

    Slow Photography is absolutelly stunning. Fred Conrad must be the next incarnation of Sudek. ( I bet he know s this famous, one handed, Czech genius photorapher
    of 20’s who produced equally ingenious balc/whiteimages in his time. Immortal!

    richard nordstrom

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    6:15 am

    What a beautiful essay. It isn’t often we get to slow down in our world. It is even more rare that we can find the time to really look at that with which we are involved. Mr. Conrad has found the secret to being in the moment.

    Katherine Nelson

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    6:19 am

    These are so beautiful! And they would not be the same in color. Now I’m so intrigued, I have to Google Admirals’ Row in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

    Suhrud

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    6:48 am

    Oh what a fantastic collection of long exposure shots and what an imagination. I especially love the Fort Tompkins and Manhattan images. I wonder if you would share some tips for taking such long exposure pictures and post-production for a beginner casual photographer like myself.

    Gail Peck

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    7:35 am

    Are you saying that you achieved these results with one shot only? Additionally, I’m wondering what the changing light in a one hour exposure does. All of these have such beautiful tones.

    Barbara Michel

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    7:47 am

    Thanks for the reminder to “see” and consider what you are looking at.

    Ron Cowie

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    7:49 am

    I just spoke on a panel for the University of Cincinnati’s journalism program.
    This very subject came up and your reasoning for using film and large format reflected my views and practices.

    Erik

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    7:50 am

    Good article for teaching?

    Sandy Sorlien

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:00 am

    It would be appropriate to add “After Sugimoto” to the title of the Loew’s image.

    Gary O’Brien

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:09 am

    Beautifully photographed and written. I have been thinking about getting out the 8×10 for some time, and I believe I will today.

    Not only do I miss film, I miss the darkroom, too. The amber glow of the safelights, the sound of running water and music that fits the mood, the thrill of seeing the print come up in the developer.

    Sitting at my desk with two monitors has a completely different feel. Not worse, just different. I’m glad to have experienced both worlds.

    Gary O’Brien
    garyobrien.com

    Raymond Adams

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:14 am

    Stunning pictures. Keep up the good work, even if it takes you a while.

    Ken

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:17 am

    Bravo, Fred. Like good manners, clean speech and happy marriages, the joys and benefits of classic photo procedures are fast fading from memory . Thanks for the reminder of what rewarding images can be created without batteries!

    Gene Lynch

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:29 am

    Hooray for slow photography, the process is inspiring and so much more involving, plus I believe, black and white is more involving for the viewer, it leaves room for the imagination. And hooray for Chuck Kelton an inspiration and voice for the black and white Photographer.

    Dick Baznik

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:44 am

    Nice article on LF photography, with excellent examples of the art and the craft. Note that there is a very active and somewhat large group of LF photographers out here, many if not most still using film. The fact that we work more slowly than our digital brethren means that we have more time to explain to curious passersby just what it is we’re (still) doing.

    Tamar Stone

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:51 am

    Thank you for making this post. In these days of instant access and gratification it’s refreshing to be reminded that there are benefits to slowing down and being able to take things in from a different perspective. I tend to call this type of work where you need to take some time to appreciate as “slow art” and as a book artist who makes work that needs the viewer to “slow down” I can greatly appreciate Fred Conrad’s work. If you are interested, my work can be seen at: web.mac.com/picturetown

    Jane Illinger

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    8:53 am

    WOW! Superb photos, wonderful addition to my favorite newspaper. Bravo, and give us more!

    Ansu

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:27 am

    WOW!!! I’m going to try this (on my digital). Very inspiring.

    ronald

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:35 am

    This is where the camera becomes the paint brush of light for the artist. The magic and mystery of this art will never die. We all are being pushed into digital, in a way it robs us of our individual talents and gifts of appreciation and understanding.

    Ron

    Ivan Garcia

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:38 am

    Ah film… I love the smell or fixer in the morning!

    Caroline Majors

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:44 am

    This may be the article I can now point people to when they quizzically look at my 645 medium format camera and ask, “Is that digital? It’s not? Why?” And ask they do.

    I also swear by Rodinal and have had a lot of fun with other Efke films (like the IR820). It’s wonderful to see your work, and I’m particularly enamoured with the Wonder Theatre, the iron staircase, and the water treatment plant.

    One day, I hope to try working with a large format camera, probably 4×5. Fingers crossed it will happen sooner than later. Thanks!

    Charles Fox

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:49 am

    Great idea for a blog, and great work by Fred. Keep it up; this puts the lie to the death of the newspaper. I’d pay extra for this blog.

    Peter

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    9:56 am

    These photographs are very rich in tone and detail. I would be surprised if that could be matched by a digital camera.

    Anne

    May 18, 2009
    ·
    10:00 am

    Visual pierces that force contemplation. Thanks.

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