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    • World Literature (WLIT)
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World Literature (WLIT)

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  • Courses of Instruction >
  • World Literature (WLIT)

Courses

WLIT 1113. World Literature I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 2113). 3 Hours.

An introduction to literature from the beginning of civilization to about 1650.

WLIT 1113H. Honors World Literature I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of both western and non-western literature. Prerequisite: Participation in Fulbright College Scholars Program or English ACT score of 28 or above.
This course is equivalent to WLIT 1113 .

WLIT 1123. World Literature II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 2123). 3 Hours.

An introduction to literature from 1650 to the present.

WLIT 1123H. Honors World Literature II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of the study of literary masterpieces of the world. Prerequisite: Participation in the Fulbright College Scholars Program or English ACT score of 28 or above.
This course is equivalent to WLIT 1123 .

WLIT 3523. The Quran as Literature. 3 Hours.

The Quran as literary text, its style and form, historical context, translation issues, communities of interpretation, and comparative perspectives. Course’s integrated approach includes translations of literature originally in Arabic. All readings in English; students with reading abilities in Arabic encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 3623. The Bible as Literature. 3 Hours.

The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms.
This course is cross-listed with ENGL 3623 .

WLIT 3713. Literature of Spain. 3 Hours.

Examines the multiple cultural traditions of Spain between 711 and 1615 C.E. Course’s integrated approach includes translation of literature originally in Arabic (50%+ of course content), Hebrew, Spanish, and French. All readings in English; students with reading abilities in original languages encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 3723. Classical Arabic Literature. 3 Hours.

Arabic literature from the 1) pre-Islamic era; 2) dawn of Islam, 610-661 C.E.; 3) Umayyad era, 661-750; Abbasid era, peaking in the ninth and tenth centuries. May include selected post-classical but pre-modern works. No Arabic required; students with Arabic encouraged to engage original text.

WLIT 3723H. Honors Classical Arabic Literature. 3 Hours.

Arabic literature from the 1) pre-Islamic era; 2) dawn of Islam, 610-661 C.E.; 3) Umayyad era, 661-750; Abbasid era, peaking in the ninth and tenth centuries. May include selected post-classical but pre-modern works. No Arabic required; students with Arabic encouraged to engage original text.
This course is equivalent to WLIT 3723 .

WLIT 3983. Special Studies. 3 Hours.

Covers a topic not usually presented in depth in regular courses. Not an independent study. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 4123. Survey of Russian Literature from Its Beginning to the 1917 Revolution. 3 Hours.

The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English.

WLIT 4133. Survey of Russian Literature Since the 1917 Revolution. 3 Hours.

The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English with readings in English.

WLIT 4993. African Literature. 3 Hours.

A study of modern African fiction, drama, poetry, and film from various parts of Africa in their cultural context. Works are in English or English translation.

WLIT 5123. Survey of Russian Literature from Its Beginning to the 1917 Revolution. 3 Hours.

(Formerly WLIT 4123 .) The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both WLIT 4123 and WLIT 5123 .

WLIT 5133. Survey of Russian Literature Since the 1917 Revolution. 3 Hours.

(Formerly WLIT 4133 .) The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English with readings in English. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both WLIT 4133 and WLIT 5133 .

WLIT 5193. Introduction to Comparative Literature. 3 Hours.

Literary theory, genres, movements, and influences.

WLIT 5523. The Quran as Literature. 3 Hours.

The Quran as literary text: its style and form, historical context, translation, issues, communities of interpretation, and comparative perspectives. Course’s integrated approach includes translations of literature originally in Arabic. All readings in English; students with reading abilities in Arabic encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 5623. The Bible as Literature. 3 Hours.

The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms.
This course is cross-listed with ENGL 5623 .

WLIT 575V. Special Investigations on World Literatures and Cultures. 1-6 Hour.

Independent study of a special topic in world literatures and cultures. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 5993. African Literature. 3 Hours.

(Formerly WLIT 4993 .) A study of modern African fiction, drama, poetry, and film from various parts of Africa in their cultural context. Works are in English or English translation. Graduate credit will not be given for both WLIT 4993 and WLIT 5993 .

WLIT 600V. Master’s Thesis. 1-6 Hour.

Master’s Thesis. May be repeated for degree credit.

WLIT 603V. Special Studies in Comparative Literature. 1-6 Hour.

Special studies in comparative literature. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 6703. Psychoanalysis and Culture. 3 Hours.

Readings of key tests in Psychoanalytic thought and cultural criticism including Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, Certeau, Zizek, and others. Selections of Psychoanalytic approaches to literature, film and gender and trauma studies.

WLIT 6713. Literature of Spain, 711-1615 C.E.. 3 Hours.

Examines the multiple cultural traditions of Spain between 711-1615 C.E. and train to produce scholarship pertinent to the field. Integrated approach includes English translations of literature originally in Arabic (50%+ of content), Hebrew, Spanish, French. Students with reading abilities in original languages encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 6803. Postcolonial Theory and Subaltern Studies. 3 Hours.

Seminar examining the geopolitical (imperial, colonial and national) implications of knowledge and culture. Selected readings of early postcolonial texts by Cesaire, Fanon, and Fernandez Retamar, as well as more recent texts by Said, Spivak, Bhabha, Mignolo, Beverly and Chakrabarty among others. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 690V. Seminar. 1-6 Hour.

Seminar. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 700V. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral Dissertation. May be repeated for degree credit.

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      English 2: World Literature & Writing

      Master Teacher: Emily-Rose Cockerham
      Duration: Yearlong course offered in fall/spring (32 weeks).
      Suggested High School Credit Value: 1 credit.
      Suggested Grade Level: 10th grade level and up. 
      Tuition: $525 for HSLDA Members/$575 for non-members.  

      Description: In English 2, students learn to analyze literature and hone their writing skills. This course will introduce students to literary classics from around the world!
      Watch a short introduction from Course Developer Carissa Campbell.

      High School English 2: World Literature —
      Live Online Class Session Schedule, August 27, 2018 – April 26, 2019

      Class Section

      Weekly Meeting Time

      Instructors

      Section 1
      Closed–Section is Full
      Mondays AND Wednesdays, 10:00–10:45 a.m. Eastern

      Mrs. Melissa O’Brien

      Section 2
      Closed–Section is Full
      Tuesdays, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Eastern

      Mrs. Lindsay Hill

      Section 3
      Closed–Section is Full
      Thursdays, 2:30–4:00 p.m. Eastern

      Mrs. Karin Morin

      Section 4
      Closed–Section is Full
      Wednesdays, 12:00–1:30 p.m. Eastern

      Mrs. Melissa O’Brien

      Section 5
      Closed–Section is Full
      Tuesdays, 2:30–4:00 p.m. Eastern

      Mrs. Lindsay Hill

      Section 6
      Closed–Section is Full
      Mondays, 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Eastern

      Ms. Emily-Rose Cockerham

      Section 7Wednesdays, 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Eastern

      Mr. Graham Jackson

      Additional class times will be added as they become available for registration. If you have questions, please call 540-338-8290 or email [email protected] .

      Frequently Asked Questions
      about English 2: World Literature

       

      Open All | Close All

      • What topics will I learn about in English 2?

        English 2: World Literature & Writing is a yearlong English course  meant to prepare students for future success in reading and writing in all environments. Students will examine various works of world literature through a Christian worldview. Topics of study include fiction, allegory, persuasion, and research. 

        By reading literature written by various authors from across the globe, students are introduced to different cultures, ethnicities, and religions. Students will use the study of world literature to improve critical thinking, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and literary analysis. 

      • How much homework is in English 2?

        We estimate that the course workload will take 5-10 hours per week.

        During a typical week in this course, students will complete the following coursework:

        • 60–90 minutes of live class instruction
        • ~40–50 pages of reading, guided by reading questions
        • Grammar exercise (some self-graded, some teacher-graded)
        • Vocabulary list and accompanying quiz
        • Occasional discussion forums or other homework assignments

        Throughout the year, students will also complete the following tasks:

        • 9 literary works with audio lecture introductions (~30 minutes per lecture)
        • Test or quiz covering each full-length book
        • Additional short stories or poems, with accompanying quizzes
        • 3–4  writing projects per semester, including a research paper
      • What books will I use in English 2?

        The o fficial booklist for English 2: World Literature & Writing is now available. In the official booklist, you will find information about the editions, book descriptions, and the reasons why HSLDA Online Academy selected these books.

        You can order course materials for competitive prices through our Christian Book Distributors bookstore. Use the Textbook Finder to locate the required resources for your courses. Please note that while most books are available through Christian Book Distributors, some titles are not carried and will need to be purchased elsewhere.

      • Am I ready to take English 2?

        Students should be able to read, write, and follow instructions at a high school level. Students will need to be self-motivated, as they are expected to read independently and participate thoughtfully in class discussions. Some concepts encountered through the literature and discussions will require students to evaluate new and controversial ideas. Students are expected to approach every topic with maturity. These ideas will be measured against a biblical worldview. 

        Please visit our Academic Readiness page for more information.

      • What is a Live Online Class Session in English 2?

        In every HSLDA Academy course, students meet weekly with their instructor and classmates in an online classroom for additional teaching, discussion, Q&A, or group activities. The class sessions are interactive and are conducted using a web meeting software with video, audio, chat, and application sharing capabilities.

        Scheduled, real-time sessions in the online classroom are not the only form of instruction available in a HSLDA Online Academy course, but are offered in addition to lectures or other instructional materials that students are able to access online at their convenience.

        When they register, students will need to select a particular class section and live class meeting time. Additional class sections may be added to the schedule at a later point in the course registration period. Registered students will be notified of any changes to the live session schedule.

      • What if I have a schedule conflict with the listed English 2 class time?

        All live class sessions are recorded for later viewing. While it is recommended that students attend each live class session, students can make arrangements to watch the recordings and receive full participation credit.

        Students should contact their instructor at the start of their course to inform the instructor of any foreseen schedule conflicts. 

      • What is the tuition for English 2?

        Please visit our tuition and discounts page for a full summary about course costs.

        HSLDA members save $50 on yearlong high school courses!


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      Classical Learning Resource Center

      live online classes for homeschool families in Greek, Latin, Literature, Writing, History, Math, Great Books, Mythology, Modern Languages, Christian Studies Navigation

      • About the CLRC Literature and Composition Program
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      • Upper Elementary Language Arts II
      • Upper Elementary Language Arts III
      • Introduction to Literature and Composition
      • Intermediate Literature and Composition
      • British Literature High School
      • American Literature High School
      • Introduction to Poetry
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      • Classical Rhetoric
      • Summer ’18 Literature  Composition Classes

      Aboabout-literature-and-compositionut CLRC Literature and Composition Classes

      CLRC Literature and Composition classes guide students through some of the world’s greatest literature. Students receive regular writing assignments that grow in length from one to many paragraphs. These assignments increase in complexity from simple plot narrations and character sketches to examinations of theme, structure, and symbolism. Students receive extensive comments on their work as they move through the writing process. CLRC Literature and Composition classes train students in descriptive, expository, persuasive, comparative, and research essay writing. All papers are written in MLA format. Students learn to observe plot structure, to track character development, and to identify and utilize many important literary devices. Class discussions–an important part of the Literature and Composition program–consider not only the over-arching themes of the literary work, but also the significance of these ideas in our everyday lives.


      “Your literature and grammar classes have been a life saver for our homeschooling.”
       — Christine D., Washington


      Ten Distinctives of CLRC’s Literature  Composition Program

      (Click on each item for full details)

      1. Students read the great classics…
      2. Students learn the art of persuasion…
      3. We remember what we read…
      4. Each student is treated as an individual…
      5. The role of the teacher is as a mentor, a guide…
      6. Students learn to discuss deep ideas…
      7. Students learn to discuss in an environment that is both less threatening and more demanding than a traditional classroom…
      8. Students are held accountable for their spelling and grammar…
      9. Exams are the least important part of what we do…
      10. We’re not afraid to challenge our students at CLRC, but…



      • Our Literature and Composition Teachers

      KATHRYN SMITH, PH.D.
      SHAWN RAGAN, M.A.
      CARA VALLE, B.A.
      TESSA CARMAN, B.A.
      WES CALLIHAN, B.A.
      SERAPHIM WINSLOW, B.A.
      ALLISON GRAY, B.A.